1. Subscribermoonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    Joined
    31 May '12
    Moves
    2092
    01 Nov '18 20:221 edit
    @fabianfnas said
    The first computer I had, a Nascom, buildt around a Z80, didn't have space for an assembler. I coded everything directly in machine code.
    One of my programs were a MasterMind game. Both CodeMaker side and CodeBreaker.
    Later, on a PC, I wrote a crossword generator in Assembler, for Intel 8086 processor.
    Those were the days... (Sigh)
    My but code was elegant in the days when we had only a few KB of RAM.
  2. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Cosmopolis
    Joined
    27 Oct '04
    Moves
    78935
    02 Nov '18 16:38
    @bigdoggproblem said
    Right...unless you made a separate document, there was no comments possible.

    I remember learning assembly language. Fortunately, by that time, there was C for writing actual programs. The only assembly language programs I ever wrote were academic assignments.

    It was useful for understanding what higher level languages actually do, at least.
    I haven't written an entire function in assembly in years, although the gnu one does allow comments. These days I'll very occasionally need access to specific machine instructions, for example rdtsc to get timing information.

    The time it's most likely to be important is for highly optimized code you sometimes need to look at the compiler's output. Intel processors read instructions 16 bytes at a time and if the inner loop fits into one of these blocks it'll run about 30% faster. One time I had to optimise a function where the API specified the lengths of the inputs with 64 bit integers. Looking at the compiler output using objdump, which tells you the instruction length, I noticed that because the loop counter was 64 bit a rex prefix was causing the inner loop to be 17 bytes long. So I just changed the type of the loop counter and added some defences against stupidly large buffers and that produced the required speed up.
  3. Joined
    21 Aug '03
    Moves
    384747
    03 Dec '18 23:38
    I think my favourite was 6811 assembler (an alarm clock in 512 bytes)...

    or maybe C... I wrote the assembler in C...

    most hateful language? C hash... 🙂
  4. Joined
    25 Jul '07
    Moves
    22363
    06 Dec '18 22:051 edit
    LISP. The meta-object protocol puts the OO frameworks in other languages to shame. In some ways it was *too* flexible as people could do (and did!) all kinds of weird stuff, but the language is beautifully elegant, and in many ways greatly influenced Java and later Python.
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